Call nowBook now

I'm Ready for MY Free Estimate!

or call (770) 862-2119

Acacia is an entire family of trees and shrubs that are native to Australia, Africa, and Hawaii. The wood has been introduced to many different areas and is routinely grown on commercial farms as well. You can find domestic acacia as well as imported acacia for your hardwood floor. Often, it is overlooked because many people assume that the wood is expensive. However, it is as unique and beautiful as many exotic hardwoods while still being moderately priced.

 

The Coloring

 Acacia is unique for many reasons; one of the most prominent reasons is the coloring. Acacia has a very prominent grain that can range from red to honey to dark brown to bronze. These colors can even occur within the same plank of wood, giving the wood a varied appearance. That can sometimes make it difficult to match acacia to your decor. If you have other woods in your home, such as chairs and tables, it can be easier to match acacia since the acacia will incorporate colors of many different woods.

 

Durability

 Acacia rates higher than oak, hickory, and maple on the janka hardness scale. That means that it’s less likely to get scratched up by moving furniture, high heels, and pet claws. One of the most common ways to scratch wood is actually dirt and pebbles that are stuck to your shoes. When you walk around with your shoes on, the dirt and pebbles scratch the hardwood. A harder wood is less likely to get scratched.

A harder wood is also more durable once it is installed. Acacia also tends to be denser than some other domestics. That makes it more resistant to mold and moisture damage. Insects have a harder time boring into the wood as well.

Since it is dense and does not scratch easily, maintenance is simpler. You just need to sweep your hardwood floor occasionally. You need to wet mop it every few weeks. Just be sure that you don’t use too much water when you mop and that you dry up any big spills. Acacia is resistant to moisture, but no wood survives well against standing water.

 

Cost

 Acacia looks like many exotic hardwoods that are much more expensive. Acacia might cost you more money than something more common such as red oak, but it’s still fairly moderately priced. When you consider the expense over time, the added durability of acacia makes it even more affordable for a homeowner.

Leave a Reply

Hi, How Can We Help You?